MS Finance Handbooks

2020-2021

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Financial Risk Management Track

First Semester Second Semester Third Semester Electives Prerequisites

Electives

You must take at least two STEM electives out of the four electives in the financial risk management (FRM) track.

STEM Electives

MGF 637LEC Financial Modeling

In this course, students will use financial econometric models to analyze problems of model specification, estimation, analysis and forecasting commonly faced by analysts in financial markets. The course materials cover the measurement and estimation of asset returns, earnings, macroeconomic data, risk and related applications in financial data analysis and visualization. Topics include regression analysis of time series/ARIMA models, multiple regression specifications and models of asset volatility including ARCH and GARCH. Throughout the course, students will use the statistical functions of the R programming language to analyze, model and forecast a variety of financial data.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020 | Spring 2020


MGF 639SEM Security Trading

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGF 611 or MGF 631 (or equivalent)


MGF 675LEC Multinational Banking and Finance

This course provides an in-depth study of practical applications and current issues faced by internationally active, large and complex banking organizations within the financial markets. In the first segment we will learn financial concepts such as ratio analysis, cash flow determination, and understand how Banks assess the relative risk of a corporation within the financial markets. We will then apply risk model using live case studies to assess the corporation's default risk. In the second segment we will focus on international trade finance and foreign exchange and how Banks assist corporations in hedging foreign exchange transactions. Working on case studies, students will learn international arbitrage, derivation of the International Fisher Effect, and understand and apply using practical applications currency futures, forwards and options in the international foreign exchange markets.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGF 694LEC Financial Modeling Using "R"

This course utilizes "R," instead of Excel, as the computational tool. Students will learn how to download and process public data associated with economics, finance and accounting. Students will also learn how to apply "R" to various finance theories.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered:
Pre-Requisite: Two graduate courses, preferably Co


Non-STEM Electives

MGA 604LEC Fin Analysis & Reporting

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts and issues of financial accounting with emphasis on the interpretation of financial statements. The course addresses the economic consequences of transactions and their presentation on corporate financial statements. A primary objective is to introduce corporate financial statements as a tool for company valuation and decision making. Emphasis is on the analysis of effects of decisions on financial performance and use of financial statements to evaluate organizations.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered:


MGA 632LEC Fin Statement Analysis

Development of a framework for the analysis of financial statements: study of the firm's competitive environment and business strategy, critical review of accounting quality, assessment of financial condition, and evaluation of future prospects. Methods for translating forecasts into firm value estimates are studied, as well as the use of the analysis framework in making specific business decisions, such as investing in equity securities and evaluating firms' creditworthiness.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGF 634LEC Quantitative Methods in Finance

The objective of this course is to ensure students have a solid foundation in the mathematical foundations required to understand and work with complex financial securities and derivatives. This foundation will be useful in higher level finance courses and as practitioners working in financial markets. Topics covered include stochastic calculus, continuous time finance, numerical methods, finite differences, and taylor series approximations. Applications from finance such as bond pricing, option pricing and portfolio theory are used as examples to illustrate the mathematics.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
12159 F1F LEC TR 3:30 - 4:50 p.m. Clemen 04 Unknown

MGF 636LEC Complex Financial Instruments

Students taking this course should expect to learn about financial derivatives. Among others, students will learn about how to price financial derivatives and how to incorporate various real-world frictions into binomial trees and stochastic processes (such as underlying the commonly used Black & Scholes model). In a case-study we will use R programming to replicate the risk-neutral price of a variance swap (underlying the so called Volatility Index or VIX). The course will be of particular interest for students who contemplate pursuing a career in the financial industry, e.g. as a Quantitative Analyst. The required prior courses depend on your trajectory (e.g., MGF 633 "Investment Management" or MGF 634 "Quantitative Methods in Finance"). Please consult your study guide for details. In general, students are expected to possess good knowledge of mathematics and statistics. Students should also feel comfortable with Excel and some basic programming knowledge will be helpful. Mathematical, statistical, and Excel skills required for this course will be reviewed during the course.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


Spring 2020 (01/27/2020 - 05/09/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
11380 S1F LEC MW 11 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Online Roesch, Dominik Maximilian

MGE 602LEC Global Economics

This purpose of this course is to provide business students with six core abilities in macro/global economics: to understand the historical debate between government's role and free enterprise in the economy; to understand the components of the aggregate demand for goods and services; to be able to predict the effects of monetary policy on interest rates, prices, and national income; to understand the benefits of long term supply side changes and the policies that affect supply-side economics, to understand the impact of international trade and financial investment flows on interest rates, exchange rates and national income; and to be able to predict how various economic policies affect the long term growth potential of both developed and emerging markets.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGE 692 Special Topics in Economics

This course is not offered.

MGF 632SEM Corporate Governance & Finance

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered:
Pre-Requisite: MGF 611 or MGF 631 (or equivalent)


MGF 646SEM Institutional Investing

The seminar focuses on investment policy and portfolio management of tax-exempt institutional funds, with an emphasis on endowments. The class will discuss asset allocation, risk, the role of active management, incentive structures, governance, and manager selection and evaluation.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered:
Pre-Requisite: MGF 611 or MGF 631 or equivalent or


MGF 657LEC Financial Innovation

This course introduces students to financial innovations and new products in the financial system. The course provides a general understanding of the financial evolution process, the causes and consequences of financial innovations, and the cost and value of these innovations. The course covers such topics as theory of financial innovation, the financial engineering process, birth and growth of new financial products, financial innovations and new debt, equity and derivative products, and the role of financial instruments in financial, investment and ristk management. The course emphasizes the motivations of financial innovation and methods to design financial instruments to solve complex financial problems and enhance investment returns.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGF 658LEC M&A Strategy/Financing

Provides a detailed understanding of the merger and acquisition process, both from the sell-side (using auctions or negotiated sale processes) and the buy-side (including the perspective of strategic buyers and private equity firms). Students will learn key aspects of acquisition strategy, deal structure, valuation, due diligence, financial modeling, accounting and regulatory issues, as well as preparation and presentation of oral and written investment memorandums. The course will also introduce the financing and transaction documents necessary to consummate an acquisition and steps to improve post-closing success.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGF 633 or MGE 604 or MS Accounting


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
11895 F1F LEC W 6:30 - 9:10 p.m. Obrian 210 Dunbar, John Francis

MGF 687LEC Financial Technology (FinTech) Lab

Many aspects of finance require an intermediary (middleman) to allow the exchange of assets and information. Financial intermediation has evolved from early systems of banking to our current system of financial intermediaries, where firms facilitate payment/transactions, capital fundraising, provide advice and financial management services. Technology is changing the way financial intermediaries deliver all of these services. Because of the hybrid nature of this area (Finance and Information Systems), it is increasingly important that finance students understand information system issues/limitations and vice versa.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGF 691 Special Topics in Finance

This course is not offered.

One other graduate course may be approved by the program director as an elective.

Note: Not all electives are offered every semester.

Financial Risk Management / Fintech Track

Fall 1 Spring Fall 2 Electives Prerequisites

Electives

Path 1

MGS 613LEC Database Mgmt Systems

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of database management systems (DBMS) and the skills needed to design and implement a relational database. Students will be introduced to data modeling concepts, modeling tools, the process of transforming conceptual models into relational database designs, and finally the steps needed to implement those designs. Emphasis is placed on Entity-Relationship diagramming, data normalization, database administration, and data definition, data manipulation and query development using Structured Query Language (SQL). Other topics covered include: object-oriented databases, database security and integrity, web/database integration, application development in a Client/Server environment, distributed databases, data warehousing, data mining and knowledge management via the Internet to support electronic commerce. Readings, lectures, interactive case assignments and a database design project reinforce the role of DBMS in supporting organizational systems, transaction processing and decision support applications.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
11907 F2S LEC MW 12:30 - 1:50 p.m. Frnczk 454 Mulgund, Pavankumar Pralhad
12124 F1S LEC MW 2 - 3:20 p.m. Frnczk 422 Mulgund, Pavankumar Pralhad

MGS 614LEC Systems Analysis & Design

This course provides an introduction to the systems development life cycle (SDLC) emphasizing the recent adaptive approaches to SDLC, such as the unified process life cycle and agile methods. The course focuses on the disciplines of business modeling, requirements analysis, and logical design and utilizes the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for analysis, modeling, and design of business-oriented information systems. Information assurance issues of system controls and security are covered with respect to their impact on system requirements and design models.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


Spring 2020 (01/27/2020 - 05/09/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
19661 S3S LEC TR 11 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Online Mulgund, Pavankumar Pralhad
15754 S2S LEC F 1 - 3:50 p.m. Online Basile, Jennifer Lynn
11330 S1S LEC TR 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. Online Mulgund, Pavankumar Pralhad

MGS 642LEC IS Auditing for IT Managers

The course is designed to introduce basic tenets of IT auditing and structured way of conducting IT audits. The course will teach students concepts and approaches to audit, control, monitor, and assess an organization's information technology and business systems. The course will impart skills and knowledge to assess vulnerabilities, report on compliance and institute controls within an enterprise.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
24288 F2S LEC F 6:30 - 9:20 p.m. Jacobs 112 Unknown
19878 F1S LEC T 6:30 - 9:10 p.m. Jacobs 112 Gupta, Manish

MGS 650LEC Information Assurance

This is an interdisciplinary course in Information Assurance that has two primary objectives: 1) to introduce students to fundamental concepts, terminologies, IA models and practices. 2) to view how different fields of disciplines interact in this area. The course will familiarize students with the technical, legal, socio-political, and managerial issues of IA. Broadly, the issues that we will cover in this course include: security investigation and analysis; ethical, legal, and professional aspects of Information assurance; risk management and implementation and maintenance of information assurance.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGS 602.


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
18314 F2S LEC TR 5 - 6:20 p.m. Norton 218 Cleary, Kevin Patrick

Path 2

MGS 602LEC Global IT Infrastructure Mgmt

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of business data communications. The objective of the course is to provide students with a firm foundation for covering more advanced topics in subsequent courses. The student will develop an understanding of networks including the internet and the development of World Wide Web based applications. The course will also cover the basic principles of network operating systems concepts and the role of network operating systems in developing Web applications. The course includes extensive coverage of business telecommunication including voice and data. Coverage is extended to coding and digitizing, modems, protocols, and network architectures as well as management aspects. Cases on telecommunications and electronic commerce, as well as current readings, will also be part of the pedagogy.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
11991 F1S LEC MW 5 - 6:20 p.m. Capen 262 Katerinsky, Alan A

MGS 613LEC Database Mgmt Systems

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of database management systems (DBMS) and the skills needed to design and implement a relational database. Students will be introduced to data modeling concepts, modeling tools, the process of transforming conceptual models into relational database designs, and finally the steps needed to implement those designs. Emphasis is placed on Entity-Relationship diagramming, data normalization, database administration, and data definition, data manipulation and query development using Structured Query Language (SQL). Other topics covered include: object-oriented databases, database security and integrity, web/database integration, application development in a Client/Server environment, distributed databases, data warehousing, data mining and knowledge management via the Internet to support electronic commerce. Readings, lectures, interactive case assignments and a database design project reinforce the role of DBMS in supporting organizational systems, transaction processing and decision support applications.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
11907 F2S LEC MW 12:30 - 1:50 p.m. Frnczk 454 Mulgund, Pavankumar Pralhad
12124 F1S LEC MW 2 - 3:20 p.m. Frnczk 422 Mulgund, Pavankumar Pralhad

MGS 650LEC Information Assurance

This is an interdisciplinary course in Information Assurance that has two primary objectives: 1) to introduce students to fundamental concepts, terminologies, IA models and practices. 2) to view how different fields of disciplines interact in this area. The course will familiarize students with the technical, legal, socio-political, and managerial issues of IA. Broadly, the issues that we will cover in this course include: security investigation and analysis; ethical, legal, and professional aspects of Information assurance; risk management and implementation and maintenance of information assurance.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGS 602.


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
18314 F2S LEC TR 5 - 6:20 p.m. Norton 218 Cleary, Kevin Patrick

MGS 618 Special Topics in Information Systems - Digital Product Management

An alternative graduate course may be approved by the program director as an elective.

Quantitative Finance Track

First Semester Second Semester Third Semester Electives Prerequisites

MGA 604LEC Fin Analysis & Reporting

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts and issues of financial accounting with emphasis on the interpretation of financial statements. The course addresses the economic consequences of transactions and their presentation on corporate financial statements. A primary objective is to introduce corporate financial statements as a tool for company valuation and decision making. Emphasis is on the analysis of effects of decisions on financial performance and use of financial statements to evaluate organizations.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered:


MGA 632LEC Fin Statement Analysis

Development of a framework for the analysis of financial statements: study of the firm's competitive environment and business strategy, critical review of accounting quality, assessment of financial condition, and evaluation of future prospects. Methods for translating forecasts into firm value estimates are studied, as well as the use of the analysis framework in making specific business decisions, such as investing in equity securities and evaluating firms' creditworthiness.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGE 602LEC Global Economics

This purpose of this course is to provide business students with six core abilities in macro/global economics: to understand the historical debate between government's role and free enterprise in the economy; to understand the components of the aggregate demand for goods and services; to be able to predict the effects of monetary policy on interest rates, prices, and national income; to understand the benefits of long term supply side changes and the policies that affect supply-side economics, to understand the impact of international trade and financial investment flows on interest rates, exchange rates and national income; and to be able to predict how various economic policies affect the long term growth potential of both developed and emerging markets.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGE 692 Special Topics in Economics

This course is not offered.

MGF 632SEM Corporate Governance & Finance

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered:
Pre-Requisite: MGF 611 or MGF 631 (or equivalent)


MGF 639SEM Security Trading

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGF 611 or MGF 631 (or equivalent)


MGF 641LEC Financial Policies and Strategies

This course provides an in-depth treatment of corporate finance concepts for all finance majors, with the purpose of furthering students' understanding of major corporate financial policies and decisions. These decisions include choosing between competing investment opportunities, measuring risk and return, how to value a business, how much debt to issue, how much equity to issue, what level of dividend to payout, and incentive structure for managers, and so on. The course starts with a discussion on corporate financial goals and corporate governance issues. It then proceeds to cover topics that center on corporate investment decisions, corporate valuation, and capital structure issues.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020 | Spring 2020


Note: MGF 641 counts towards finance concentration, not IA concentration.

MGF 646SEM Institutional Investing

The seminar focuses on investment policy and portfolio management of tax-exempt institutional funds, with an emphasis on endowments. The class will discuss asset allocation, risk, the role of active management, incentive structures, governance, and manager selection and evaluation.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered:
Pre-Requisite: MGF 611 or MGF 631 or equivalent or


MGF 657LEC Financial Innovation

This course introduces students to financial innovations and new products in the financial system. The course provides a general understanding of the financial evolution process, the causes and consequences of financial innovations, and the cost and value of these innovations. The course covers such topics as theory of financial innovation, the financial engineering process, birth and growth of new financial products, financial innovations and new debt, equity and derivative products, and the role of financial instruments in financial, investment and ristk management. The course emphasizes the motivations of financial innovation and methods to design financial instruments to solve complex financial problems and enhance investment returns.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGF 658LEC M&A Strategy/Financing

Provides a detailed understanding of the merger and acquisition process, both from the sell-side (using auctions or negotiated sale processes) and the buy-side (including the perspective of strategic buyers and private equity firms). Students will learn key aspects of acquisition strategy, deal structure, valuation, due diligence, financial modeling, accounting and regulatory issues, as well as preparation and presentation of oral and written investment memorandums. The course will also introduce the financing and transaction documents necessary to consummate an acquisition and steps to improve post-closing success.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGF 633 or MGE 604 or MS Accounting


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
11895 F1F LEC W 6:30 - 9:10 p.m. Obrian 210 Dunbar, John Francis

MGF 661LEC Mgmt of Fin Institutions

The financial services industry is very dynamic and continues to undergo dramatic changes. Many forces contribute to the changes including interest rates, overall market and credit factors, consolidation within the industry, and regulations. From this perspective, the course explores the basic management problems in the credit, investment, and financing administration functions of financial institutions, including commercial banks in the United States and abroad.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGF 631 Or MGQ 606.


MGF 685LEC International Finance Management

This course is designed to familiarize students with the core concepts related to international financial management, including foreign exchange markets (from institutional details to quantitative models for the forecasting of future exchange rates), currency risk derivatives (spanning both a discussion of contract characteristics and quantitative methods for pricing and valuation of currency forwards, options, and swap contracts), quantitative approaches for risk management and hedging in cross-border settings, quantitative analysis of currency arbitrage operations, analysis of translation, economic, and political risks, cross-border financing, issues with cross-border taxation, analysis of institutional details and recent statistics on foreign debt and equity markets, and other topics.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGF 611 and MGQ 608.


Fall 2020 (08/31/2020 - 12/11/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
12005 F1F LEC MW 3:30 - 4:50 p.m. Jacobs 110 Fotak, Veljko N

MGF 687LEC Financial Technology (FinTech) Lab

Many aspects of finance require an intermediary (middleman) to allow the exchange of assets and information. Financial intermediation has evolved from early systems of banking to our current system of financial intermediaries, where firms facilitate payment/transactions, capital fundraising, provide advice and financial management services. Technology is changing the way financial intermediaries deliver all of these services. Because of the hybrid nature of this area (Finance and Information Systems), it is increasingly important that finance students understand information system issues/limitations and vice versa.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


Spring 2020 (01/27/2020 - 05/08/2020)

Reg. Num. Section Type Topic Days Time Location Instructor
24807 S1F LEC F 10 a.m. - 12:50 p.m. Online Wolfe, Brian A

MGF 694LEC Financial Modeling Using "R"

This course utilizes "R," instead of Excel, as the computational tool. Students will learn how to download and process public data associated with economics, finance and accounting. Students will also learn how to apply "R" to various finance theories.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered:
Pre-Requisite: Two graduate courses, preferably Co


MGF 691 Special Topics in Finance

This course is not offered.

An alternative graduate course may be approved by the program director as an elective

Note: Not all electives are offered every semester.

Quantitative Finance / Fintech Track

Fall 1 Spring Fall 2 Electives Prerequisites

Electives

Path 1

MGS 613LEC Database Mgmt Systems

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of database management systems (DBMS) and the skills needed to design and implement a relational database. Students will be introduced to data modeling concepts, modeling tools, the process of transforming conceptual models into relational database designs, and finally the steps needed to implement those designs. Emphasis is placed on Entity-Relationship diagramming, data normalization, database administration, and data definition, data manipulation and query development using Structured Query Language (SQL). Other topics covered include: object-oriented databases, database security and integrity, web/database integration, application development in a Client/Server environment, distributed databases, data warehousing, data mining and knowledge management via the Internet to support electronic commerce. Readings, lectures, interactive case assignments and a database design project reinforce the role of DBMS in supporting organizational systems, transaction processing and decision support applications.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGS 614LEC Systems Analysis & Design

This course provides an introduction to the systems development life cycle (SDLC) emphasizing the recent adaptive approaches to SDLC, such as the unified process life cycle and agile methods. The course focuses on the disciplines of business modeling, requirements analysis, and logical design and utilizes the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for analysis, modeling, and design of business-oriented information systems. Information assurance issues of system controls and security are covered with respect to their impact on system requirements and design models.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGS 642LEC IS Auditing for IT Managers

The course is designed to introduce basic tenets of IT auditing and structured way of conducting IT audits. The course will teach students concepts and approaches to audit, control, monitor, and assess an organization's information technology and business systems. The course will impart skills and knowledge to assess vulnerabilities, report on compliance and institute controls within an enterprise.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGS 650LEC Information Assurance

This is an interdisciplinary course in Information Assurance that has two primary objectives: 1) to introduce students to fundamental concepts, terminologies, IA models and practices. 2) to view how different fields of disciplines interact in this area. The course will familiarize students with the technical, legal, socio-political, and managerial issues of IA. Broadly, the issues that we will cover in this course include: security investigation and analysis; ethical, legal, and professional aspects of Information assurance; risk management and implementation and maintenance of information assurance.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGS 602.


Path 2

MGS 602LEC Global IT Infrastructure Mgmt

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of business data communications. The objective of the course is to provide students with a firm foundation for covering more advanced topics in subsequent courses. The student will develop an understanding of networks including the internet and the development of World Wide Web based applications. The course will also cover the basic principles of network operating systems concepts and the role of network operating systems in developing Web applications. The course includes extensive coverage of business telecommunication including voice and data. Coverage is extended to coding and digitizing, modems, protocols, and network architectures as well as management aspects. Cases on telecommunications and electronic commerce, as well as current readings, will also be part of the pedagogy.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGS 613LEC Database Mgmt Systems

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of database management systems (DBMS) and the skills needed to design and implement a relational database. Students will be introduced to data modeling concepts, modeling tools, the process of transforming conceptual models into relational database designs, and finally the steps needed to implement those designs. Emphasis is placed on Entity-Relationship diagramming, data normalization, database administration, and data definition, data manipulation and query development using Structured Query Language (SQL). Other topics covered include: object-oriented databases, database security and integrity, web/database integration, application development in a Client/Server environment, distributed databases, data warehousing, data mining and knowledge management via the Internet to support electronic commerce. Readings, lectures, interactive case assignments and a database design project reinforce the role of DBMS in supporting organizational systems, transaction processing and decision support applications.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGS 650LEC Information Assurance

This is an interdisciplinary course in Information Assurance that has two primary objectives: 1) to introduce students to fundamental concepts, terminologies, IA models and practices. 2) to view how different fields of disciplines interact in this area. The course will familiarize students with the technical, legal, socio-political, and managerial issues of IA. Broadly, the issues that we will cover in this course include: security investigation and analysis; ethical, legal, and professional aspects of Information assurance; risk management and implementation and maintenance of information assurance.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGS 602.


MGS 618 Special Topics in Information Systems - Digital Product Management

Path 3

MGS 655LEC Distributed Computing and Big Data Technologies

Large scale computing environments aggregate resources from many autonomous computers to satisfy the information processing needs of modern enterprises. This course introduces techniques for creating functional, usable, high-performance distributed systems. Objectives are twofold: (1) gain a solid understanding of the technical issues, concepts and systems in the rapidly advancing technologies in distributed computing, and (2) acquire substantial knowledge on how to work with big data in distributed environments. The course is organized into two parts: study of DCS technologies, and study of large scale systems. We will discuss communication and networking services, application support services, large scale distributed system design, data management and interoperability of systems including consistency and data replication. Students will learn to use a framework for data intensive distributed applications (Apache Hadoop) and an associated parallel programming model, MapReduce.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGS 662LEC Optimization Methods for Machine Learning

Investment in government and business infrastructure has lead to the accumulation of vast amounts of data in recent years. This course will discuss how techniques from convex optimization can be used to extract useful knowledge and business value from the data collected. It introduces students to the theory of convex optimization of relevance to managerial decision making and machine learning. Topics include convex sets and functions, formulation of convex optimization problems, and convex optimization algorithms including gradient, sub-gradient, proximal and interior point methods. Numerous examples will be chosen from machine learning problems including classification, regression and clustering. Students will have hands on experience with the R programming language and optimization packages including MOSEK. We will examine real world examples and case studies from text mining, medical applications, fraud detection, finance, and social networks.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


+ Any two Finance or MIS electives

An alternative graduate course may be approved by the program director as an elective.

MSF/MSRED Collaborative Program (Financial Risk Management Track)

Fall 1 Spring 1 Fall 2 Spring 2 Fall 3

MGF 633LEC Investment Management

This course provides students with a general understanding of the operation of capital markets and basic analytical tools of investment management. Specifically, the course covers such topics as principles of valuation, risk analysis, modern portfolio theory, Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), market microstructure, index models, arbitrage pricing models, bonds and common stocks valuation, efficient market hypotheses, investment management, and option pricing models.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020 | Spring 2020


MGF 661LEC Mgmt of Fin Institutions

The financial services industry is very dynamic and continues to undergo dramatic changes. Many forces contribute to the changes including interest rates, overall market and credit factors, consolidation within the industry, and regulations. From this perspective, the course explores the basic management problems in the credit, investment, and financing administration functions of financial institutions, including commercial banks in the United States and abroad.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGF 631 Or MGQ 606.


MGF 685LEC International Finance Management

This course is designed to familiarize students with the core concepts related to international financial management, including foreign exchange markets (from institutional details to quantitative models for the forecasting of future exchange rates), currency risk derivatives (spanning both a discussion of contract characteristics and quantitative methods for pricing and valuation of currency forwards, options, and swap contracts), quantitative approaches for risk management and hedging in cross-border settings, quantitative analysis of currency arbitrage operations, analysis of translation, economic, and political risks, cross-border financing, issues with cross-border taxation, analysis of institutional details and recent statistics on foreign debt and equity markets, and other topics.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Pre-Requisite: MGF 611 and MGQ 608.


STEM or Non-STEM Elective (select one)

MSF/MSRED Collaborative Program (Quantitative Finance Track)

Fall 1 Spring 1 Fall 2 Spring 2 Fall 3

MGF 633LEC Investment Management

This course provides students with a general understanding of the operation of capital markets and basic analytical tools of investment management. Specifically, the course covers such topics as principles of valuation, risk analysis, modern portfolio theory, Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), market microstructure, index models, arbitrage pricing models, bonds and common stocks valuation, efficient market hypotheses, investment management, and option pricing models.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020 | Spring 2020


MGF 634LEC Quantitative Methods in Finance

The objective of this course is to ensure students have a solid foundation in the mathematical foundations required to understand and work with complex financial securities and derivatives. This foundation will be useful in higher level finance courses and as practitioners working in financial markets. Topics covered include stochastic calculus, continuous time finance, numerical methods, finite differences, and taylor series approximations. Applications from finance such as bond pricing, option pricing and portfolio theory are used as examples to illustrate the mathematics.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020


MGF 635LEC Financial Derivatives

Objectives of this technical course include providing students with knowledge of specific trading mechanics, basic economic concepts and technical asset valuation tools to successfully employ a wide variety of derivative securities into a risk management context; as well as to understand risk-return tradeoffs associated with specialized speculative strategies in derivatives markets. A broad survey of rapidly-changing forward, futures, options, swaps (and other related derivative types) is followed by emphasis upon asset pricing models of complex financial instruments using both classical economic theory and advanced mathematical techniques. Basic knowledge of differential calculus is expected. Basics of stochastic calculus will be covered. Students will be prepared to employ material learned into a corporate (or smaller firm) environment for management of business-related risk from fluctuating commodity prices, interest rates changes, foreign exchange fluctuations and construction of stock/bond investment fund 'portfolio insurance'.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020 | Spring 2020
Co-Requisite: MGF 633 or MS Accounting Majors.


Elective (select one)

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