MS Finance/MS Real Estate Development

Lindsay Macaluso MSF/MSRED 'XX?

Prepare to lead in one of the world’s most dynamic and influential industries.

Learn from experienced developers and real estate professionals in the resurgent city of Buffalo, a vibrant laboratory for applied study in proximity to global financial and employment centers in New York, Boston and Toronto. Join an industry that creates places where people live and work, develops local economies and employment, and shapes cities and environments.

The School of Management and the School of Architecture and Planning offer a collaborative program leading to both the Master of Science in Finance (financial risk management or quantitative finance track) and Master of Science in Real Estate Development degrees.

Timeline

You can complete the collaborative MSF/MSRED in 2.5 years and 75 credits. (If you were to complete the MSF and MSRED programs separately, it would take three years and 84 credits.)

Admissions

Apply to both schools

Apply to both programs at the same time and indicate on each application that you intend to pursue the collaborative program. Administrators from both programs will coordinate their reviews of your applications and make every effort to respond to you at the same time regarding their decision. Each school will apply the same admissions requirements and standards that prevail for its other applicants.

Total Hour Requirements

Contact Us

Graduate Programs Office
School of Management
University at Buffalo
203 Alfiero Center
Buffalo, NY 14260-4010

Tel:  716-645-3204
Fax: 716-645-2341
som-apps@buffalo.edu
Meet our Team

Real Estate  Credits School of Management Credits
RED core courses
RED electives
MSRED credits
36
6-9
42-45
MSF core courses
MSF electives
MSF credits
24
9-12
30-33

Note: 6 credits of electives must be taken from MSRED and 6 credits must be taken from MSF.  3 credits (one class) can be selected from either department by the student.

Search School of Management courses and descriptions.

MSF/MSRED Collaborative Program (Financial Risk Management Track)

Fall 1 Spring 1 Fall 2 Spring 2 Fall 3

MGF 635LEC Financial Derivatives

Objectives of this technical course include providing students with knowledge of specific trading mechanics, basic economic concepts and technical asset valuation tools to successfully employ a wide variety of derivative securities into a risk management context; as well as to understand risk-return tradeoffs associated with specialized speculative strategies in derivatives markets. A broad survey of rapidly-changing forward, futures, options, swaps (and other related derivative types) is followed by emphasis upon asset pricing models of complex financial instruments using both classical economic theory and advanced mathematical techniques. Basic knowledge of differential calculus is expected. Basics of stochastic calculus will be covered. Students will be prepared to employ material learned into a corporate (or smaller firm) environment for management of business-related risk from fluctuating commodity prices, interest rates changes, foreign exchange fluctuations and construction of stock/bond investment fund 'portfolio insurance'.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020 | Spring 2020
Co-Requisite: MGF 633 or MS Accounting Majors.


MGF 638LEC Fixed Income Securities

This is a course about fixed-income securities and markets. It covers topics that are important for any MBA student that anticipates hedging interest rate exposures or otherwise transacting in the fixed-income market. The course reviews basic bond pricing concepts and important features of interest rate futures and options contracts. It also introduces a few (somewhat complicated) models of the term structure. This is a rigorous course that requires students to be familiar with basic investments and calculus concepts. While MGF633 is not a prerequisite for this course, students that are taking MGF633 simultaneously with the course will be better prepared. Like most finance courses, the course focuses more on lasting financial principles than on current institutional details.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGF 641LEC Financial Policies and Strategies

This course provides an in-depth treatment of corporate finance concepts for all finance majors, with the purpose of furthering students' understanding of major corporate financial policies and decisions. These decisions include choosing between competing investment opportunities, measuring risk and return, how to value a business, how much debt to issue, how much equity to issue, what level of dividend to payout, and incentive structure for managers, and so on. The course starts with a discussion on corporate financial goals and corporate governance issues. It then proceeds to cover topics that center on corporate investment decisions, corporate valuation, and capital structure issues.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020 | Spring 2020


MGF 696LEC Portfolio Theory and Strategy

The course covers sophisticated approaches to investing and it has an introduction and three main parts. The introduction covers measures of performance and risk and methods to calculate them in closed form or from historical data. The first part of the course covers investment strategies across several asset classes, from traditional ones such as value or growth investing to strategies employed by hedge funds, such as arbitrage, option trading and other quant strategies. The second part of the course addresses portfolio construction, from assessing a utility function to the investor to constructing an optimal portfolio maximizing that utility. Investor types covered are individuals saving for retirement, speculators, university endowments or foundations, or pension funds. Finally, the last part of the course addresses the topic of risk measurement and management, with an emphasis of risks faced by decentralized organizations, such as funds of funds, foundations, or pension funds.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Co-Requisite: MGF 633.


STEM or Non-STEM Elective (select one)

MSF/MSRED Collaborative Program (Quantitative Finance Track)

Fall 1 Spring 1 Fall 2 Spring 2 Fall 3

MGF 636LEC Complex Financial Instruments

Students taking this course should expect to learn about financial derivatives. Among others, students will learn about how to price financial derivatives and how to incorporate various real-world frictions into binomial trees and stochastic processes (such as underlying the commonly used Black & Scholes model). In a case-study we will use R programming to replicate the risk-neutral price of a variance swap (underlying the so called Volatility Index or VIX). The course will be of particular interest for students who contemplate pursuing a career in the financial industry, e.g. as a Quantitative Analyst. The required prior courses depend on your trajectory (e.g., MGF 633 "Investment Management" or MGF 634 "Quantitative Methods in Finance"). Please consult your study guide for details. In general, students are expected to possess good knowledge of mathematics and statistics. Students should also feel comfortable with Excel and some basic programming knowledge will be helpful. Mathematical, statistical, and Excel skills required for this course will be reviewed during the course.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGF 637LEC Financial Modeling

In this course, students will use financial econometric models to analyze problems of model specification, estimation, analysis and forecasting commonly faced by analysts in financial markets. The course materials cover the measurement and estimation of asset returns, earnings, macroeconomic data, risk and related applications in financial data analysis and visualization. Topics include regression analysis of time series/ARIMA models, multiple regression specifications and models of asset volatility including ARCH and GARCH. Throughout the course, students will use the statistical functions of the R programming language to analyze, model and forecast a variety of financial data.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020 | Spring 2020


MGF 638LEC Fixed Income Securities

This is a course about fixed-income securities and markets. It covers topics that are important for any MBA student that anticipates hedging interest rate exposures or otherwise transacting in the fixed-income market. The course reviews basic bond pricing concepts and important features of interest rate futures and options contracts. It also introduces a few (somewhat complicated) models of the term structure. This is a rigorous course that requires students to be familiar with basic investments and calculus concepts. While MGF633 is not a prerequisite for this course, students that are taking MGF633 simultaneously with the course will be better prepared. Like most finance courses, the course focuses more on lasting financial principles than on current institutional details.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Spring 2020


MGF 696LEC Portfolio Theory and Strategy

The course covers sophisticated approaches to investing and it has an introduction and three main parts. The introduction covers measures of performance and risk and methods to calculate them in closed form or from historical data. The first part of the course covers investment strategies across several asset classes, from traditional ones such as value or growth investing to strategies employed by hedge funds, such as arbitrage, option trading and other quant strategies. The second part of the course addresses portfolio construction, from assessing a utility function to the investor to constructing an optimal portfolio maximizing that utility. Investor types covered are individuals saving for retirement, speculators, university endowments or foundations, or pension funds. Finally, the last part of the course addresses the topic of risk measurement and management, with an emphasis of risks faced by decentralized organizations, such as funds of funds, foundations, or pension funds.

Credits: 3.00
Semesters offered: Fall 2020
Co-Requisite: MGF 633.


Elective (select one)