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All Course Descriptions

The School of Management faculty currently authorizes this list of course descriptions broken down alphabetically and by subject areas.  A class schedule is issued before each term indicating which courses will be offered. Prerequisites for specific courses indicate the normal preparation and provide for the proper sequencing of courses in a total program. It is to be understood, however, that students may also be admitted to a course with written consent of the instructor.

Accounting

MGA 604 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS AND REPORTING (3)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts and issues of financial accounting with emphasis on the interpretation of financial statements. The course addresses the economic consequences of transactions and their presentation on corporate financial statements. A primary objective is to introduce corporate financial statements as a tool for company valuation and decision making. Emphasis is on the analysis of effects of decisions on financial performance and use of financial statements to evaluate organizations.

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MGA 606 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL REPORTING  (3)

A rigorous study of the theory and practice of financial accounting, with special emphasis on current problems of income determination, valuation of assets and equities, and preparation, analysis, and interpretation of published financial statements. The focus is on accounting choice in the business environment, providing the context for understanding forces affecting accounting choice, and why these forces might be perceived differently by management, auditors, security analysts, investors, and lenders. Current issues are researched via the Internet and student projects.
Prerequisite: MGA 604

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MGA 607 ADVANCED FINANCIAL REPORTING (3)

Reporting for combined corporate entities, spin-offs and reorganizations, international operations, financial instruments, governments and not-for-profit organizations. Current reporting issues and business applications are addressed using fact-based case studies and the professional literature.
Prerequisite: MGA 606 or equivalent.

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MGA 609 MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING (3)

This course focuses on the identification, analysis, and use of costs and other information to improve the competitiveness of business operations. The course takes a user orientation and focuses on issues important to managers for planning and decision making, economic evaluation of business activities, product costing, and performance evaluation and control. Emphasis is placed on the effects of advances in technology on the value of cost system information, the relevance and limitations of accounting data and use of non-financial information for internal decisions.
Prerequisite: MGA 604.

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MGA 611 INCOME TAX DETERMINATION and PLANNING (3)

A study of the concepts of federal income tax law applicable to individuals and business entities, including property transactions and compensation planning; the social, economic and political considerations which underlie the law; and the use of the tax law for the purpose of better business and investment decision making. The course also introduces the use of computer-based tax research tools.
Prerequisite: MGA 604.

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MGA 612 TAXATION OF BUSINESS ENTITIES AND THEIR OWNERS (3)

An examination of the tax provisions governing C corporations, S corporations and partnerships, including transactions between the entity and the owner, special concerns and opportunities for the closely held business and tax considerations involved in the choice of entity. Use of computer-based tax research tools is further developed.
Prerequisite: MGA 611 or equivalent.

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MGA 613 AUDITING (3)

Analysis of the structure of a financial statement audit and environmental factors affecting the audit. Topics include professional ethics, litigation, internal control, forms of evidence, statistical sampling, substantive tests, and various types of audit reports. The course integrates important auditing concepts, including key provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and related Section 404 audits, in a logical manner to aid in the understanding of audit decision making and evidence accumulation in today’s complex audit environment. Students apply concepts by preparing a computerized practice case simulating an actual audit. The course makes extensive use of NAARS and Internet information.
Prerequisite: MGA 606 or equiv.

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MGA 614 ADVANCED AUDITING (3)

Advanced-level examination of external auditing issues and practice, with major emphasis on the evaluation of audit risk. Emphasis is on case analysis using internet-based and practitioner/faculty developed resources. Emerging issues in auditing are identified and analyzed using audit concepts learned in MGA 613.
Prerequisite: MGA 613 or equiv.

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MGA 617 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING AND CONTROL (3)

Applications-based analysis of current management accounting topics, including activity-based management, value chain analysis, capacity management, quality control, target costing, benchmarking, and the balanced scorecard. Emphasis is on case analysis demonstrating the role of management accounting information in actual business decisions.
Prerequisites: MGA 609 or equivalent.

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MGA 618 SEMINAR IN FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3)

This course examines the supply of and demand for financial and accounting information. Issues covered include the relationship between financial statement information and investors and creditors, the role of security analysts, the incentives of corporate managers, and the roles that auditors and rule-making agencies play in improving the quality and availability of information. Particular emphasis is placed on the prior accounting research on these topics.
Prerequisite: MGA 606 or equivalent.

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MGA 620 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (1)

A brief introduction to managerial accounting. Through use of case studies, this course will focus on different methods used for understanding and assigning product costs, as well as break even analysis.

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MGA 620 SEMINARS: THEORY OF CONSTRAINTS (1)

The course focuses on Goldratt's well-known book The Goal and the "Theory of Constraints" concepts that follow from it. A business novel, its principles have been long known and followed in the manufacturing world. However, the concepts presented have many applications well beyond manufacturing, and provide useful tools for financial and cost management, decision analysis, and other areas. Familiarity with theory of constraints principles gives you new insight into a variety of business problems.

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MGA 632 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS (3)

Development of a framework for the analysis of financial statements: study of the firm's competitive environment and business strategy, critical review of accounting quality, assessment of financial condition, and evaluation of future prospects. Methods for translating forecasts into firm value estimates are studied, as well as the use of the analysis framework in making specific business decisions, such as investing in equity securities and evaluating firms' creditworthiness.
Prerequisites: MGA 604 and, MGF 631.

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MGA 635 GLOBAL FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING  (3)

Study of the institutional structure of global capital markets, international reporting standards, and financial reporting practices worldwide. Analysis of financial statements of non-U.S. firms from various regions, with particular attention to reporting and disclosure incentives.
Prerequisite: MGA 604 or equivalent.

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MGA 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (Variable)

Instructional and practical experience in the skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit up to 6 hours, depending upon type and amount of research activity. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman.

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Organization

MGB 601 BEHAVIORAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL CONCEPTS FOR MANAGEMENT (3)

This course introduces students to the basic tools and concepts needed to effectively manage “organizational behavior” (OB). A wide spectrum of contemporary OB Topics is reviewed, including: communication, learning, diversity, multiculturalism, teamwork, motivation, power, innovation, leadership, organizational design, and change. Learning occurs through a variety of activities such as case discussions, self-assessments, group exercises, role-playing, team projects, lectures, and training videos. 

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MGB 607 MOTIVATION AND LEADERSHIP (3)

This MBA-level, very applied course focuses on how to be a leader in organizations. Students have the opportunity to hear and speak to successful leaders including CEOs, Vice Presidents, consultants, and entrepreneurs in a variety of organizations. One of the major assignments of the course is for a student to develop his or her own approach to being a leader in a current or future job based on the topics in the course. Topics include: what does it mean to be a leader, how to lead from an individual perspective in an organization, what is the role of personality, vision, emotions, thinking, ethics, courage and followership, how to lead others in an organization, what is the role of motivation, empowerment, communication, diversity, power, and influence, how to lead by using the systems in organizations, what is the role of strategy, culture, values, change, and organizational learning.

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MGB 619 FACILITATING GROUP DYNAMICS (3)

The approach for this course is interactive and participative, using activities to reinforce topics and concepts. Participants learn by doing, reflecting and discussing activities. The lessons they discover are based on their experience, which reinforces understanding and commitment.

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MGB 620 EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE (1)

Success in today's organizations depends on your ability to learn and adapt quickly to new and changing situations. The objective of this course is therefore to prepare students to be life-long adapters. The course is based on a model of self-directed learning and development. This process will help students throughout their careers in understanding and formulating their own vision, in assessing their skills and abilities and designing plans to reach their objectives. From mastery of this basic process comes the ability to lead others effectively.

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MGB 620 CRISIS MANAGEMENT (1)

Crises are everyday occurrences in organizations. For example, companies deal with crises associated with defective products such as Toyota in the USA, Europe and Japan. Governments are also faced with crises such as the 9/11 Terrorist Attacks and Hurricane Katrina. Finally Non for Profit Organizations encounter various types of crises as well. For example, a couple of years ago the United Way dealt with issues relating to financial improprieties of its senior executive. These are only a few examples of highly publicized crises that have occurred over the past few years. This course examines the nature of crises and incorporates topics from the fields of Marketing, Management and Public Relations. After completing the course, students will gain a better understanding of issues relating to crisis management including risk assessment, crisis prevention, crisis preparation, crisis recognition, crisis containment, and post crisis assessment.

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MGB 620 CULTURAL CHANGE OF GLOBAL BUSINESSES (3)

The ability to manage cross-culturally is a growing challenge faced by professionals that do business globally. Learning about the culture and business practices in a country that is different from your own, is essential for achieving your business goals. This course will give students the opportunity to learn about cross-cultural (or inter-cultural) business practices and how to succeed when working with others from different geographical locations. We will explore such topics as expatriate (someone living and working abroad) selection and best practices for adjustment, business etiquette in various geographical locations, and how to work with people (co-workers, clients, customers, etc) from various cultures throughout the world.

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MGB 625 POWER AND INFLUENCE (3)

This course will provide students with an understanding of the nature of power and political processes in complex organizations. The particular focus will be on understanding how power and influence can be developed and used to get things done when responsibilities exceed formal authority. Cases, critical incidents, and experiential exercises will be used to consider various strategies and tactics. Various moral and ethical issues will also be explored.

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MGB 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (3)

Instructional and practical experience in skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit up to 6 hours depending upon type and amount of research activities. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman. 

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Economics

MGE 601 ECONOMICS FOR MANAGERS (3)

The fundamental economic principles underlying the operation of modern businesses in market-based economies are investigated. Among the questions addressed are: How does the distinction between costs in the short and long run affect decisions? How do costs, demand, price, and profit relate? What factors determine the degree of competition in an industry? What pricing strategies are available to a firm? How can the use of game theory improve managers’ decisions? How do managers use regression analysis? How does market structure determine profitability?

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MGE 602 THE GLOBAL ECONOMY AND THE BUSINESS FIRM (3)

A study of the patterns and fluctuations of growth of the aggregate level of economic activity in a modern complex society. Among the topics included are: the measurement and determination of national income; the nature and role of money and interest rates; inflation; the role of expectations; the role of trade; macro economic forecasting; alternative fiscal and monetary policies and their role in promoting stability and progress; and macro aspects of legislation. Prerequisite: MGE 601 or undergrad.

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MGE 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (Variable)

Instructional and practical experience in skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit up to 6 hours, depending upon type and amount of research activities. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman.

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Finance

MGF 620 MICROFINANCE (3)

This mini-course is an introduction to the field of Microfinance, defined as the provision of financial services to those too poor to be served by traditional financial institutions. We will explore what microfinance is, how it got started, and how it operates today around the world. Course activities will include lectures, films, and a short research paper.
In 2006 Muhammad Yunus received the Nobel Peace Prize for his pioneering efforts in the field of Microfinance. Also referred to as ‘Inclusive Finance’, Microfinance is widely recognized as one approach to alleviate poverty. In addition, microfinance is increasingly viewed as a profit-making opportunity by financial institutions (e.g., Citigroup). So, for a variety of reasons, microfinance today is a very relevant topic and one that lies outside the mainstream of typical MBA finance courses.
The microfinance mini-course is primarily descriptive, and will cover topics such as the similarities and differences in lending practices of commercial banks and microfinance banks, loan portfolio evaluation, micro loan pricing, etc. To take one example of a difference: The average loan size of one of the largest microfinance banks in the world, Grameen Bank of Bangladesh (which recently opened a branch in New York City), is less than $125. This has implications for many management issues, including collection policies, loan officer staffing and training, etc. We will also briefly cover Islamic banking practices, important because many microfinance organizations operate is countries that are predominately Islamic.

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MGF 631 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

The scope and objectives of corporate financial management are introduced along with the concept of the risk- return trade-off. The various sources of capital are discussed, along with their costs. Financial planning with special emphasis on the evaluation of capital projects is considered. The implications of the efficient market hypothesis are considered throughout the course.
Prerequisites: MGA 604, MGQ 606 or concurrent registration in MGQ 606.

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MGF 633 INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT (3)

This course provides students with a general understanding of the operation of capital markets and basic analytical tools of investment management. Specifically, the course covers such topics as principles of valuation, risk analysis, modern portfolio theory, Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), market microstructure, index models, arbitrage pricing models, bonds and common stocks valuation, efficient market hypotheses, investment management, and option pricing models.
Prerequisite: MGF 631. (May be taken concurrently with MGF 631 in the SPRING)

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MGF 636 COMPLEX FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (3)

This course deals with pricing and market mechanisms of such complex financial instruments as options, futures, and assets with contingent payoff structures. The investment usefulness of the financial instruments as well as applications of the pricing models of options are thoroughly covered.
Prerequisites: MGF 631, MGF 633 or permission of instructor.

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MGF 637 FINANCIAL MODELING (3)

This course covers the models of corporate finance and investments. We will cover how to use spreadsheet programs, such as Microsoft Excel, to build and analyze financial models. The financial models we will review are pro forma financial statement analysis, cost of capital modeling, portfolio management modeling, etc. Also, other empirical models of corporate finance and asset pricing will be introduced, such as time series properties of stock return etc. Although MGF633, MGF 641, and MGF 642 are not prerequisite for this course, taking those courses simultaneously will be plus.
Prerequisite: MGF 631, MGF 633 recommended

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MGF 638 FIXED INCOME SECURITIES DESCRIPTION (3)

This is a course about fixed-income securities and markets. It covers topics that are important for any MBA student that anticipates hedging interest rate exposures or otherwise transacting in the fixed-income market. The course reviews basic bond pricing concepts and important features of interest rate futures and options contracts. It also introduces a few (somewhat complicated) models of the term structure. This is a rigorous course that requires students to be familiar with basic investments and calculus concepts. While MGF633 is not a prerequisite for this course, students that are taking MGF633 simultaneously with the course will be better prepared. Like most finance courses, the course focuses
more on lasting financial principles than on current institutional details.
Prerequisite: MGF 631, MGF 633 recommended.

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MGF 641 FINANCIAL POLICIES AND STRATEGIES (3)

The course emphasizes financing policies, e.g., capital structure policies, maturity decisions, dividend decisions, and determining financing needs and how to design optimal, long-term financing arrangements, including capital structure planning. The concept of the market for corporate control is introduced as a means of management discipline. Three to six comprehensive cases are used.
Prerequisite: MGF 631.

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MGF 643 STRATEGIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND VALUE CREATION (3)

This course develops an understanding of how financial management decisions help create shareholder value. Many decision problems such as valuation, capital budgeting, and strategic investment decisions are examined. The course emphasizes skills and abilities to apply analytical reasoning to complex, practical problems. It will provide students with valuation skills useful for buy-side analysts as well as financial managers who will deal with restructuring of assets and liabilities, and mergers and acquisitions. Many cases will be used.
Prerequisites: MGF 631, MGF 633

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MGF 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (Variable)

Instructional and practical experience in the skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit up to 6 hours, depending on the type and amount of research activities.
May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman.

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MGF 656 ACQUISITIONS TRANSACTIONS (3)

This course is devoted to an in-depth analysis of one or more transactions for the purchase of a business entity. The focus of the course will be the perspectives and concerns of the buyers. We will also review the perspectives and concerns of each of the other major participants in the transaction and identify how these perspectives and concerns are reflected in the ultimate structure of the transaction and the associated documentation. This course is co-taught by School of Law and School of Management faculty, and is cross-listed with LAW856.
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

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MGF 658 MERGERS AND ACQUISITION STRATEGY AND FINANCING (3)

Examines the development of the private equity and venture capital industries over the past 20 years. Students will learn the various aspects of identifying, analyzing, structuring and financing acquisitions. This will provide an in-depth study of the business concepts reflected in the legal documents analyzed in the existing course MGF 656 / LAW 856 Acquisition Transactions.

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MGF 661 MANAGEMENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS (3)

The basic management problems in the loan, investment, and deposit administration functions of financial institutions are thoroughly analyzed. Potential solutions to these problems are discussed as well as the interrelationships between these problems. Both modeling and cases are used to illustrate problem identification and solution.
Prerequisite: MGF 631.

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MGF 685 INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)

This course is designed to familiarize students with several basic areas of international financial management, including foreign exchange markets, international financing and investment decisions, international financial markets, transfer pricing, and selected policy issues. In all these fields, theory, applications, and cases are equally emphasized. Typical topics include international financial accounting; speculating, covering, and hedging activities in foreign exchange markets; translation, economic and political risks; arbitrage operations; capital budgeting; the cost of capital and international capital asset pricing; and the determination of security prices.
Prerequisites: MGF 631, MGQ 606

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MGF 696 PORTFOLIO THEORY AND STRATEGY (3)

This course focuses primarily on stock investment strategies for active investors in inefficient markets and secondarily on portfolio strategies in efficient markets. Students will gain an understanding of the technical analysis of price movements, psychology of market participants, and multi-factor expected return models. Typical investment approaches such as value and growth investing are thoroughly examined.
Prerequisites: MGF 633 and permission of instructor.

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General Management

MGG 619 BUSINESS OF SPORTS (1)

While sports is fun and exciting – sports, particularly at the “big-time” collegiate and professional levels, is a business. This course is designed for students who are interested in understanding the business of sport and the businesses that impact sport. The goal of the course is to help the students understand the business of sport through reading, class discussion, and short written assignments that provide their reflection on the business aspect of athletics in our society.

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MGG 619 BUSINESS OF LIFE SCIENCES (1)

This course will study what managing life science companies entails, and will examine strategies needed to develop successful companies in this realm. Entrepreneurial opportunities found in life sciences, including pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical devices sectors will be discussed. Topics will include creation of new ventures, acquiring funding for such ventures, aspects of life science business development, intellectual property issues, and licensing concerns.

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MGG 620 THE BUSINESSS OF HEALTHCARE (1)

Healthcare spending in 2010 reached 17% of GDP, and if it continues unabated, it will reach 25% by 2025. This clearly unsustainable model impacts the lives of every business and every man, woman, and child in the United States. Costs continue to grow despite innumerable intervention attempts by the government and by private industry. Control is made much more difficult because of the unique role that health insurance plays, insulating consumers from typical market dynamics. This course will investigate the market structure of healthcare today, as well as the reform measures being proposed for the future. It will look at spending and demand, how the insurance industry impacts consumer behavior, the role of physicians, healthcare systems, the pharmaceutical industry and the impact of government intervention. It will reinforce these macro discussions with case reviews of real-life problems being faced by healthcare executives today. The course will reinforce these competencies: Strategic Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making, Team Skills, and most importantly, Integrity.

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MGG 620 LEADING ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE (3)

The course examines the process of bringing about productive organizational change. There is an emphasis throughout on practice rather than theory and participants will be encouraged to 'translate' the course content to their own worlds of work, past, present and future, and to share their experiences during class dialogue. Participants will formulate the ability to design and lead organizational change, combining both 'tangible' aspects (e.g. designing a change process) and 'intangible' competencies (e.g. appraising and interpreting responses to the change initiative).

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MGG 621 MANAGERIAL GAME THEORY (1)

Managers continually have to make decisions in situations in which the outcomes depend, at least in part, on what their competitors do. Game theory provides a lens that is useful for examining these types of strategic interactions. This mini-course will introduce you to some simple frameworks and tools from game theory that you can use to analyze strategic interactions to inform decision making. We will look at a wide range of examples from business, law, politics, and everyday life to illustrate the power of this approach. The class will be highly interactive. There will be minimal lecture and a high level of discussion and real-time working through problems. The assignments will consist of in-class exercises and a take-home problem set. Because game theory is a branch of mathematics, the course will use some math so you should be comfortable with basic algebra. Many of the applications of game theory have been developed within the field of economics, so some background in microeconomics while not necessary, will be helpful. There will be a pre-assignment consisting of a short reading prior to the first class meeting.

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MGG 622 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (3)

Leadership development is the process of enhancing your skills to influence and organize others to accomplish key goals. It goes beyond knowledge of leadership theories by focusing on building skills to inspire and organize people to achieve tangible results. Four goals for the course: To increase your understanding of your own strengths, proficiencies, and development needs, to build your repertoires of influence tactics, so that you can expand your personal spheres of influence to accomplish personal and/or organizational goals, to enhance your confidence for tackling leadership challenges as well as your resilience for dealing with obstacles so that you can achieve desired results and to make this a useful, fun, and interesting course that will significantly accelerate your leadership development.

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MGG 622 PRESENTATION SKILLS (1)

Dynamite Presentations: Strategies for better design and delivery This mini-course is designed to give students a chance to upgrade the construction of their presentations as well as refine important delivery skills. Topics covered include stage presence, delivery techniques and principles of persuasion. Students will also learn about contemporary approaches to presentation planning and design. Students will have opportunities to practice and strengthen oral communication skills in the classroom setting and receive valuable feedback on personal techniques and mannerisms. Please note: If you have already taken Communication Skills, you are not eligible to take Presentation Skills.

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MGG 633 MODELING MANAGERIAL PROCESSES (1)

Historically, managers have considered decision making as an art; something learned by trial and error; something based on creativity, judgment, intuition, and experience. This course gives you a structured way of attacking a wide range of real problems, using data-driven analysis to guide decision-making. We will consider how to think about and manage uncertainty and risk, how to translate data about the business into useful insights, how to put value on various courses of action, and how to generally make informed decisions. The main focus of the course will be on modeling decisions in the spreadsheet environment, illustrated by applications from operations, finance, marketing, and human resources. The approaches and techniques for decision-making are useful throughout the firm, both within functional areas and for the essential management challenge of working across functional boundaries.

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MGG 636 COMMUNICATION SKILLS (3)

This course will focus on development of practical skills necessary to assess and develop people in the workplace. Included is information on, and practice in development of: interview skills (for selection of new employees and evaluation of continuing employees); presentation skills (both oral and written presentation); general interpersonal skills. 

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MGG 640 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF NEGOTIATIONS (3)

Introduction to the analytical concepts necessary for effective negotiations. Emphasis is on the negotiation and bargaining skills required by general managers. Classroom lectures are supplemented by experiential exercises.

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MGG 643 TEAM BUILDING (3)

This course focuses on recent approaches to team building that typically occur in most high performing organizations. The course relies on in-class exercises as well as team projects to teach in applied terms how to lead and function as a member of self-directed and cross-functional teams.
Prerequisite: MGB 601 or permission of instructor.

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MGG 650 CONSULTING PRACTICES (3)

This is a practical, hands-on course that will focus on the concepts, tools, and techniques associated with being a successful consultant and agent of change. The course covers the nuts-and-bolts of the consulting relationship. Students will learn about contracting, managing the relationship, and alternative deliverable formats. Students will also learn about the dynamics of change in organizations and the processes that create and sustain organizational development. Students will engage in the design and execution of a group consulting project in a local organization.

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Health Systems

MGH 631 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION (3)

Broad introduction to health care delivery in the U.S. Examines topics such as health manpower, ambulatory care, hospitals, long-term care, managed care, financing, cost containment, and quality of care.

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MGH 632 HEALTH CARE STRATEGY AND OPERATIONS (3)

This course covers the application of management knowledge and skills in the strategic guidance and operational direction of health systems service organizations. Attention is given to unique aspects of the challenge of managing the delivery of health services, particularly to such issues as managing relationships with medical staffs, regulatory bodies, other professional groups, and third party payers. The integration of management functions such as finance and accounting, marketing, human resources, and service production, amidst rapidly changing expectations will also be covered in assigned case analysis.

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MGH 633 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH ECONOMICS (3)

Provides the student with the ability to apply economic reasoning to health care markets. Topics include discussion of the organization of the hospital, payment systems, costs and charges, markets for physician services, cost-effectiveness analysis, outcomes research, and health care reform.

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Human Resources

MGI 601 PRINCIPLES OF WORKFORCE ENGAGEMENT (3)

 This course will examine Human Resources from a strategic perspective, emphasizing the contribution of HR decisions to the development of a high performance organization. HRM will be treated as a dynamic system that enables organizations to cope more quickly and effectively with a rapidly changing environment. The course will emphasize those topics, such as reward systems, performance management and the selection and retention of high performance employees, that confront managers in a variety of organizational roles. Emphasis will be given to the identification, evaluation and solution of specific HR problems facing managers with these responsibilities.

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MGI 602 ADVANCED TOPICS IN WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT (3)

This is a follow up course to MGI 601 that will focus on staffing, compensation and performance management and will provide more in-depth coverage of these subjects than the introductory course. The objective is to give students hands-on practice in developing and using tools for an HR Manager.
Prerequisite: MGI 601

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MGI 620 CAREER MANAGEMENT (1)

Upon completion of the Career Management Course, you should have gained an understanding of what it means to manage your career and why it is important. You will learn the essential elements of effective career management and develop a strategy to get and keep your career on track. You will have access to tools that will help implement your strategy.

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MGI 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (variable)

Instructional and practical experience in skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit up to 6 hours, depending upon type and amount of research activities. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman. 

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Marketing

MGM 619 SALES MANAGEMENT (1)

The goal of the course is to provide MBA Students with knowledge, skills and understanding of the key components of a successful sales organization. The course will focus on the following topics: Basic Sales Skills, Hiring Sales People, Sales Coverage Models, Compensation and Sales Management Process.

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MGM 620 INTEGRATED MARKETING (3)

This course will provide both a theoretical framework and applied methodologies for developing and executing integrated advertising, promotion, public relations, direct, trade and on-line marketing initiatives. Starting with an analysis of the firm's business objectives (volume/profit/share), the course will explore the analytic and planning processes and tools that are applicable in both consumer and B2B environments.

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MGM 620 SOCIAL MEDIA IN BUSINESS (1)

This course will explore the phenomenal growth of Social Media and its impact on today’s workforce and the organizations for which they work. Whether a private or not-for-profit organization, ignoring these ‘new’ marketing tools is not an option. Students will learn about how some of the most progressive companies and institutions employ social media in an effort to build and maintain business. The course will also focus on the current leaders in social and professional networking websites -- Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter and YouTube – and provide the students hands-on experience with each. Laptop preferred for live learning. Students will be expected to complete a short group project utilizing one or more of the social media sites discussed in class.

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MGM 620 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING PRACTICUM (3)

This course focuses on international marketing strategies and tactics. Course meets once a week on Thursday evenings and runs January through March with international trip to France and England during the week of spring break. Trip cost ~$3300.00 in addition to tuition. Students registered for at least six credits may request additional financial aid to cover the cost of the trip.This course focuses on international marketing strategies and tactics. Course meets once a week on Thursday evenings and runs January through March with international trip to France and England during the week of spring break. Trip cost in addition to tuition.

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MGM 625 MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3)

An introduction to managerial decisions in the marketing area and approaches to making these decisions. Among the topics considered are the institutional framework of retail and industrial markets; buyer behavior; and product line, promotion, pricing, and distribution decisions and strategies. Impact and relevance of electronic markets are also considered. 

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MGM 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (Variable)

Instructional and practical experience in skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit: up to 6 hours, depending upon type and amount of research activities. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman. 

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MGM 651 CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3)

Pertinent theoretical and empirical findings about the behavior of consumers and industrial and institutional buyers are discussed. Topics include motivation, learning, attitude formation, attitude change, and the relation between attitudes and behavior as applied to buyers. The impact of the electronic environment is also discussed as are innovation and market communication and the social and cultural concepts underlying strategies of market segmentation.
Prerequisites: MGM 625, MGQ 606.

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MGM 656 DESIGN, MANUFACTURING, AND MARKETING OF PRODUCTS (3)

The first part of this course focuses on interaction among design, engineering, manufacturing, and marketing to develop successful new products in a short period of time in both traditional and electronic markets. The second half emphasizes issues dealing with the management of product offerings. It uses a combination of lectures, cases, and projects to help students gain mastery of the subject matter.
Prerequisite: MGM 625.

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MGM 659 MARKET PLANNING (3)

This course deals with the development and application of marketing strategy. The major pedagogical vehicle is MARKSTRAT 3 — a competitive marketing game. Students manage a company in direct competition with other student teams in a highly dynamic environment.
Prerequisite: MGM 625.

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MGM 664 MARKETING PRACTICUM (3)

This course allows students the opportunity to apply the key concepts, tools, and techniques learned in marketing to a corporate setting. Working as a team, students perform a extensive analysis of the company’s product line; conduct qualitative and quantitative research; and prepare and present a comprehensive management consulting report.
Prerequisite: MGM 625, MGM 667. NOT OFFERED ON A REGULAR BASIS.

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MGM 667 MARKETING RESEARCH (3)

Methods and functions of research in marketing management. Attention given to problems of conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of research designs and to techniques of analysis of research data.
Prerequisites: One semester of statistics; MGM 625 as a pre-or co-requisite.

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MGM 670 ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION (3)

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the best available approaches to managerial decision making in developing an integrated communication strategy involving advertising, promotions, and publicity. Recent analytical approaches will be stressed and the course will show inter-relatedness between these decision areas.
Prerequisite: MGM 625

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MGM 671 DATA ANALYSIS SYSTEMS FOR MARKETING DECISIONS (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a working knowledge of systems employing large databases to support marketing decisions. To the extent possible, this course will feature actual databases and illustrative examples of decisions based on their use. Major types of systems considered will be point-of-sale scanner data, geo-demographic databases, large scale databases on product and media use provided by Simmons and MRI, databases for direct marketing. Decisions to be considered will be category management and retail product strategies, targeting for advertising and direct mail, segmentation, retail location, pricing, and promotion.
Prerequisite: MGM 625.

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MGM 683 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3)

The objective of this course is to develop familiarity with the problems and perspectives of marketing across national boundaries and to gain knowledge of tools and approaches to make international marketing decisions.
The influence of e-commerce on international marketing problems such as gray channel and price coordination is also analyzed.
Prerequisite: MGM 625.

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Operations

MGO 630 OPERATIONS AND SERVICE MANAGEMENT (3)

The main component of the course is a survey of methods for planning and controlling production and operations management activities including material requirements planning, operations scheduling, production and inventory planning and control, project management, facilities location and layout, and quality management and control. The course makes use of cases to illustrate the processes and problems involved.
Prerequisites: MGA 604, MGF 631 or concurrent.

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MGO 631 PRODUCTION AND INVENTORY PLANNING (3)

This course focuses on production and inventory management problems in the entire supply chain, and the application of quantitative models and information systems and technologies for these problems. An enterprise resource planning (ERP) system platform is assumed and the course also covers the implementation aspects of ERP systems. The topics covered include supply chain strategy and coordination mechanisms, forecasting systems, aggregate planning, advanced planning systems (APS), master production scheduling, materials requirements planning (MRP) systems, inventory management for suppliers, manufacturers and distributors, cellular manufacturing, just-in-time (JIT) systems, lean manufacturing, optimized production technology (OPT), and flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) technologies. The completion of this course will enable students to take the certification examinations (CPIM/CFPIM) for American Production and Inventory Control Society (APICS).
Prerequisite: MGO 630

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MGO 632 STRATEGIC QUALITY MANAGEMENT (3)

The primary objective for this course is to develop a personal understanding of Strategic Quality Management, based on the business excellence model described in the U.S. Malcolm Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, and ISO 9004:2000, using contemporary applications of management theory that demonstrate “How to” improve business results using quality management tools.
Prerequisite: MGO 630 or concurrent with MGO 630, or permission of instructor.

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MGO 633 SUPPLY CHAINS AND GLOBAL OPERATIONS (3)

This course deals with design, control, and operation of supply chains for competing effectively in the context of global operations management. Both manufacturing and service (such as health care) industry supply chains are covered. The topics covered include: state-of-the-art qualitative and quantitative techniques for optimum configuration of in-bound and outbound logistics, principles of postponement in design, processes and logistics, mass customization, global location factors for offices, plants and distribution centers, collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment (CPFR) systems, countering bullwhip effects in supply chains, vendor managed inventory (VMI), strategic alliances and partnering, global purchasing and buyer-supplier relationships, and the complexities of the material, information, and cash flows across international borders. This course supplements MGS 616, which covers e-commerce integration aspects of supply chains.
Prerequisite: MGO 630.

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MGO 634 PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3)

This course deals with defining, organizing, and managing activities associated with complex, multidisciplinary projects. Such endeavors are critical to raise the level of performance of the organization and enable it to have a competitive edge. Many areas of MBA education when applied in “real world” require extraordinary and coordinated effort by various parts of the organization for implementation. In times of rapidly changing technologies and managerial processes, the need for cross-functional teams to achieve long and short term goals is increasingly imperative.
Prerequisites: MGO 630 or concurrent with MGO 630.

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MGO 636 SUPPLY CHAINS: DESIGN, MODELING AND OPTIMIZATION (3)

This course focuses on design, modeling and optimization of global supply chain networks. The course deals with modeling approaches and quantitative tools and techniques for design and optimization of global supply chain networks. The course also covers information systems and technologies for supply chain planning and coordination. The topics covered include: supply chain strategy formulation, performance metrics, new forecasting models applicable for supply chain contexts, newsvendor models for capacity and aggregate planning, models for location and design of supply and distribution entities, inter-organizational planning, advanced planning systems, multi-echelon inventory management techniques,  distribution requirements planning (DRP) systems, joint transportation-inventory models, and pricing and revenue management techniques. The course will also be taught in a manner that will enable you to obtain APICS professional certification (CPIM / CFPIM) with minimum preparation after the course. Prerequisite: MGO 630.

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MGO 637 PURCHASING AND GLOBAL SUPPLY MANAGEMENT (3)

This course focuses on purchasing and supply management principles and practices in the context of global supply chains. The importance of purchasing is primarily due to the fact that the value of materials procured in manufacturing, and service supply chains such as retail can be more than 65% of the cost of the goods sold. Given the globalization of supply sources, it has become increasingly necessary to understand the complexities of global supply markets, cross-border legal aspects of purchasing, global vendor development, systematic reduction of supply risk, strategic alliances and supply network building, vendor managed inventory (VMI) contracts, and new forms of negotiation strategies with suppliers. Purchasing practices to support lean organizations to ensure just-in-time delivery on a global basis are also covered. In addition, given the growth of internet technology, e-commerce technologies to support purchasing, and supplier relationship management (SRM) systems are also be covered. Prerequisite: MGO 630.

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MGO 638 LOGISTICS AND GLOBAL DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT (3)

This course covers global logistics and distribution issues, dealing with the management of physical material flows, documentation, and information flows in cross-border supply chains. Logistics issues such as intermodal transportation, e-fulfillment, cross-border trade regulations, reverse logistics, and design of sustainable supply chains are dealt with. The optimum design of distribution systems, inventory positioning in distribution networks, selection of optimal transportation modes, inter-modal transport, etc. are also covered. Emerging technologies such as warehouse management systems (WMS), distribution requirements planning (DRP), radio frequency identification (RFID), geographical information systems (GIS), global positioning systems (GPS) applications are also covered. Both qualitative issues (such as regulatory issues, INCO terms and documentation) as well quantitative tools and techniques such as the use of Route Assist software will be covered. Prerequisite: MGO 630.

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MGO 641 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3)

The aim of this course is to provide the analytic techniques and tools to help develop an understanding of how competitive advantage can be created and sustained. This is an integrative course that examines the firm as a whole and adopts the perspective of the general manager. It draws together and builds on ideas from courses in functional areas such as marketing, finance and operations. There is extensive use of cases. Specific topics covered include analyzing industries, analyzing firm resources and capabilities, understanding organization structure and management systems, developing competitive strategies and understanding competitive behavior, determining the scope of the firm, developing corporate strategies, managing the multi-business firm, and understanding corporate governance mechanisms.
Prerequisites: MGA 604, MGF 631, MGM 625.

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MGO 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (Variable)

Instructional and practical experience in skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit up to 6 hours, depending upon type and amount of research activities. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman. 

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MGO 660 INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3)

The purpose of this course is to help students learn how to start and run a successful business so that they can utilize their gifts and talents, become financially independent, and contribute to society. Four domains associated with the topic of entrepreneurship are examined in detail.

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Quantitative Methods

MGQ 606 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR MANAGEMENT (3)

Topics to be discussed include probability theory, counting problems, random variables (also known as probability distributions), Central Limit Theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing (including chi-square tests), regression analysis (simple and multiple) and interpretation of regression output on computers. If time available, analysis of variance.

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MGQ 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (Variable)

Instructional and practical experience in skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit up to 6 hours, depending upon type and amount of research. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman. 

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Systems

MGS 602 GLOBAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT (3)

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of business data communications. The objective of the course is to provide students with a firm foundation for covering more advanced topics in subsequent courses. The student will develop an understanding of networks including the internet and the development of World Wide Web based applications. The course will also cover the basic principles of network operating systems concepts and the role of network operating systems in developing Web applications. The course includes extensive coverage of business telecommunication including voice and data. Coverage is extended to coding and digitizing, modems, protocols, and network architectures as well as management aspects. Cases on telecommunications and electronic commerce, as well as current readings, will also be part of the pedagogy.

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MGS 607 TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT AND NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (3)

The focus of this course will be on technology management and developing an Internet-based business or extension to an existing business. The course will integrate concepts from economics, organizational strategy, entrepreneur-ship, and Web design. Topics to be covered in the course include: aligning technology and strategy; models of diffusion and innovation; characteristics of information and digital goods; identifying potential Web-applications and information products for solving a problem and/or identifying a business opportunity; intellectual property rights; pricing issues related to information goods; developing a business plan for a venture capital proposal; launching the e-business; designing Web based applications for usability; and strategies for successfully implementing systems. Case studies, lectures, guest speakers, and an integrated E-business project will be used to understand the complexities of the current business environment.

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MGS 610 DIGITAL FORENSICS (3)

This course provides students with an introduction to Digital Forensic Science and the systematic process of acquiring, authenticating and analyzing digital evidence. Technical and managerial topics will be explored, providing students with both theoretical and practical hands-on experience using forensic equipment and software. The additional topics of E-Discovery, Data Retention, Data Disposal, Litigation, Internal Investigations, Regulatory Compliance and Incident Response will also be discussed within the context of Digital Forensics. Students will have an opportunity to work with EnCase, Access Data FTK and other open source forensic software programs.

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MGS 611 MANAGEMENT OF GLOBALLY-DISTRIBUTED SERVICES (3)

"This course provides an overview of the growing phenomenon of IT-enabled globally-distributed services (GDS), what has come to be commonly known as IT and business process outsourcing. The course will cover the various phases of the GDS life cycle and discuss how companies can use the GDS paradigm to innovate their various services and processes. Topics to be covered include GDS strategy planning, process distribution analysis, global collaboration and virtual teamwork, knowledge and risk management in GDS, vendor capabilities evaluation, management of contracts and service level agreements, and governance and relationship management with GDS partners. It is also planned to have some virtual collaboration and team work with students in other foreign universities to give a hands-on feel to our students about the issues and dynamics of global collaboration."

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MGS 613 DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (3)

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of database management systems (DBMS) and the skills needed to design and implement a relational database. Students will be introduced to data modeling concepts, modeling tools, the process of transforming conceptual models into relational database designs, and finally the steps needed to implement those designs. Emphasis is placed on Entity-Relationship diagramming, data normalization, database administration, and data definition, data manipulation and query development using Structured Query Language (SQL). Other topics covered include: object-oriented databases, database security and integrity, web/database integration, application development in a Client/Server environment, distributed databases, data warehousing, data mining and knowledge management via the Internet to support electronic commerce. Readings, lectures, interactive case assignments and a database design project reinforce the role of DBMS in supporting organizational systems, transaction processing and decision support applications.
Prerequisite: MGS 602 or concurrent, or permission of instructor.

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MGS 614 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3)

This course provides an introduction to the systems development life cycle (SDLC) emphasizing the recent adaptive approaches to SDLC, such as the unified process life cycle and agile methods. The course focuses on the disciplines of business modeling, requirements analysis, and logical design and utilizes the Unified Modeling Language (UML) for analysis, modeling, and design of business-oriented information systems. Information assurance issues of system controls and security are covered with respect to their impact on system requirements and design models.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor

MGS 616 DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS (3)

B2B e-commerce and supply chain management are critically important areas that are dominating the ebusiness landscape and which will most likely determine the nature of most integrated supply transactions in the future. B2B application integration deals with the economic and technological mechanisms that allow organizations to partner, share information and collaborate in a joint value creation process. Accordingly, our goal is to prepare students for exciting careers in supply chain management, such as consultants, in-house supply chain specialists in business organizations, and even entrepreneurs. The objectives of this course are to cover the high level supply chain strategy and concepts and develop the conceptual foundations of e-business systems, technologies and practices in the B2B environment. In particular, we will address the strategic role of the supply chain in interorganizational systems, key drivers of supply chain performance, IT infrastructures and B2B technologies and tools and techniques for supply chain analysis.
Prerequisite: MGS 602.

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MGS 618 SPREADSHEET MODELING (1)

NOTE: You MUST have a laptop (and bring it to class) each session to enroll in this mini-course.
Microsoft Excel is a tremendously powerful tool; it provides the capability to manipulate complex data to provide information and to make decisions. This hands-on course is designed to enhance the skill of Excel users. I hope to show you that it really is not that difficult with a little bit of knowledge, and given a willingness to practice and make mistakes, you will be amazed at how quickly your effectiveness in using spreadsheets will improve. Exercises should enhance your skills in numerous areas including: Auditing, Toolbars, Goto Special, Charts, Basic, Customization & Custom, Customization, (Lists, Defaults, Windows), Data Analysis, Pivot Tables, Statistical, Analysis Toolpack, Formatting, Beginning to Advanced, Formulas, Functions, Beginning to Intermediate to Advanced (arrays, information, and text), Nesting, Idiot Proofing, Validation, What If Analysis, Data Tables, Scenarios, Goal Seek and Solver.

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MGS 618 NEW PRODUCT AND SERVICE DEVELOPMENT (1)

This course will draw on concepts from new product development, entrepreneurship, technology management, project management, marketing and economics to illustrate and learn-how to innovate. Learning-about will involve reading the assigned book, reading several cases pertaining to innovation and engaging in class dialog. Learning-by-doing will involve case study analyses and the development of a business plan.
The purpose of the course is to understand how new product innovation unfolds through product differentiation and versioning and how versioning guides the strategic direction of contemporary business in the development of new products and services. Dynamic tension exists between delivering feature rich Midas versions of products using extravagant engineering and the low cost Hermes versions of a product developed using frugal engineering. The results of this dynamic tension between Midas versioning and Hermes versioning are Atlas products and services. Atlas products and services incorporate the product design features that will attract the broadest customer base. The driving force behind the development of Midas, Atlas and Hermes versions is driven by the implicit creative genius that everyone possess as they engage in continuous learning-about and learn-by-doing activities.

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MGS 620 MANAGEMENT OF IT-ENABLED GLOBALLY-DISTRIBUTED WORK (3)

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the growing phenomenon of IT-enabled globally distributed services (GDS) from the perspective of a firm that is planning to or is currently engaged in distributing its various services processes globally using IT platforms and systems in various functional areas. It examines various issues related to the GDS phenomenon focusing on those GDS ventures that involve IT and IT-enabled services. The course examines the various drivers and inhibitors of the GDS phenomenon, the current business models of GDS, and the technologies, processes, and structures that enable the GDS phenomenon. It covers the various phases of the GDS life cycle and discusses how companies can use the GDS paradigm to innovate and transform their various services processes. The course also examines the issues of knowledge management across globally-distributed services teams as well as the social impacts of GDS within the firm and on local communities

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MGS 625 MANAGEMENT OF IT PROJECTS (3)

This course will introduce students to the concepts and practices of project management in an IT context. The challenges and issues that are specific to IT projects will be the focus of this course. IT Project Methodology and the concept of measurable organizational value will provide a foundation for this course. Several techniques and metrics for IT project scope, time and cost estimation such as function point analysis will be introduced. The class will also enable students to understand the integrative nature of risks associated with IT projects as a part of the risk assessment and risk management component of the course. Quality systems, such as ITIL, CMM, etc, that support IT project quality will be discussed. The students will
be introduced to change management issues including human resources and communication issues which arise as a result of a new IT project. Real world business cases will be used to further emphasize the above topics. The course will provide some basic body of knowledge that may help the students prepare for the PMI certification exams.
Prerequisite: MGS 614 or permission of instructor

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MGS 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (Variable)

Instructional and practical experience in skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research.
Credit up to 6 hours, depending upon type and amount of research activities. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of dept chairman.

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MGS 650 INFORMATION ASSURANCE (3)

This is an interdisciplinary course in Information Assurance that has two primary objectives: 1) to introduce students to fundamental concepts, terminologies, IA models and practices. 2) to view how different fields of disciplines interact in this area. The course will familiarize students with the technical, legal, socio-political, and managerial issues of IA. Broadly, the issues that we will cover in this course include: Security investigation and analysis, Ethical, legal, and professional aspects of Information assurance, Risk management and Implementation and maintenance of information assurance.

Prerequisite: MGS 602 or permission of instructor.

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MGS 651 MANAGEMENT OF COMPUTER NETWORKS (3)

The area of computer networks is currently the fastest growing part of the MIS world. This course will discuss concepts in the management of computer networks. It is an introductory course which will discuss issues in designing computer networks, administration, network operating systems and network interconnection alternatives. A hardware lab on networking will provide a "hands-on" part of the course. The course will provide the MBA (MIS concentration) student with the foundation skills to develop a career in the field of networks through their exposure to network administration, design, pricing, etc. In addition, the hardware lab for hands on network administration is unique and is not available for student use anywhere else on campus. Course topics will be drawn from: introduction to microcomputers and Local Area Networks; LAN hardware, systems software, and installation; LAN administration; Wide Area Networks; and emerging technologies.
Prerequisite: MGS 602

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MGS 655 DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING (3)

 A Distributed Computing System (DCS) interconnects many autonomous computers to satisfy the information processing needs of modern enterprises. The objectives of this course are twofold: (1) gain a solid understanding of the technical issues, concepts and systems in the rapidly advancing technologies in distributed computing, and (2) acquire a substantial level of skills in designing, programming and implementing web based systems. The course is organized into two parts: study of DCS technologies, and study of object-oriented systems. We will address communication and networking services, application support services, distribute object management, interoperability/open systems, and distributed system design. We will overview the art of object oriented programming and follow it up by a detailed study of Java.
Prerequisite: MGS 602 or concurrent with MGS 602.
THIS IS A FOLLOW-UP COURSE TO MGS 602 

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MGS 659 SEMINAR IN ELECTRONIC COMMERCE (3)

 The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of doing business via the Internet. Topics include: elements of the infrastructure of electronic commerce; technologies and applications in electronic commerce; using electronic commerce for the creation of competitive advantages; planning technology-based strategies to achieve business goals. The course will rely heavily on research and peer learning with the instructor serving as catalyst, facilitator, and evaluator in a collaborative environment.

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MGS 695 SEMINAR IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3)

This seminar provides a critical review of theory and empirical research in the information systems area. One objective of the seminar is to acquaint participants with the research approaches and procedures used in management systems and to encourage them to formulate research proposals suitable for dissertation purposes.
Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing and permission of instructor.
NOT OFFERED ON A REGULAR BASIS.

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Management and Policy

MGT 617 THE GOVERNMENT, THE LAW, AND THE FIRM (3)

 An analysis of the business sector's relation to the principal forces operating in the legal, political, and social environment. Particular attention given to constraints and freedoms offered under common, corporate, and regulation. Also examined are contemporary problems in corporate governance such as business and professional standards, code of ethics, and corporate social responsibility.

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MGT 640 LEGAL ASPECTS OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (3)

Coverage of contracts, business organizations, government regulations, and various areas of commercial law. Fundamental issues in jurisprudence, procedure and legal reasoning, and related global, ethical, and public policy issues are addressed. This in-depth survey of the law is appropriate for all management students.

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MGT 647 SUPERVISED RESEARCH (Variable)

Instructional and practical experience in skills and techniques of research through association with a faculty member actively engaged in research. Credit up to 6 hours, depending upon type and amount of research activities. May be taken for credit more than once.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chairman. 

 

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